Chemistry – Thermochemistry (14 of 37) Heat Released (Evolved) in a Reaction 1

how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below? This is a topic that many people are looking for. star-trek-voyager.net is a channel providing useful information about learning, life, digital marketing and online courses …. it will help you have an overview and solid multi-faceted knowledge . Today, star-trek-voyager.net would like to introduce to you Chemistry – Thermochemistry (14 of 37) Heat Released (Evolved) in a Reaction 1. Following along are instructions in the video below:
s another example of how to use enthalpy in calculating the heat released in a a reaction. But in this case. We have some other parameters that we need to with so here we have a displacement reaction where we take ferric oxide.
We are luminol to them and so aluminum is going to displace the iron and so now we have aluminum oxide and iron by itself. The reaction has a release of 852 kilojoules. If this of course in molar quantities.
And so now. The question is how much energy is evolved and that word evolved always gets me what we really are meaning here is the energy released in the reaction. If we use a hundred and fifty two grams of aluminum in this reaction.
So now. Its a little wrinkled to this quick to this particular problem and so in order to do that we have a handy equation right here.

how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-0
how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-0

This is how you do that so we start out with trying to calculate the energy release with thats where you do what theyre asking for when they say how much energy is evolved. They really mean how much energy is released and so we start with the energy of the reaction. The delta h.
The enthalpy so if this reaction is taking place and these were the molar quantities. Then the heat released would be 852 kilojoules in that reaction. But were limited.
Were limited by the fact we only have 152 grams of aluminum well how much is that well its a certain number of moles and so we have to figure out the mass and the molar mass and so forth. So here. We have the delta h of the reaction multiplied times.
The number of moles of the reactant that were interested in in this case. We have aluminum and so we go one reaction divided by the number of moles of the reactant because then that way the reaction cancels out and were left with number of moles.

how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-1
how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-1

But now we have to convert the number of moles to how much mass of aluminum. We have so weve put in the mass of the reactant and then the mass per mole. And when we do that in the end.
We get the total amount of energy released by this much of the aluminum. So now that we have the handy equation lets go ahead and put in all the numbers and in the end. We need to know the energy released in the equation and in this particular reaction.
Limited by 152 grams of aluminum. So the amount of energy released in the reaction. The way.
Its written out here is 800 and kilo joules. Now with multiple at at times.

how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-2
how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-2

One reaction and of course that would be per reaction and so this particular reaction gives us how many moles of aluminum and here we are we introduce two moles of aluminum li reactions so two moles of aluminum alright so that gives us a ratio of for each reaction. We consume two moles of aluminum. Now we multiply that times the mass of the reactant that was given.
Which is 152. Grams of aluminum and then we divide that by the molar mass of the aluminum and the molar mass of aluminum. Just looked it up is twenty six point nine eight grams of aluminum divided by one mole of aluminum.
Okay. Now lets see what cancels out unit wise. So we have reaction cancels out mole of aluminum cans out with mole of aluminum and grams of aluminum cancels out with grams of aluminum and then all we have left is numbers and kilojoules.
So the answer will be in kilojoules and lets find out what our calculator. What that number is so we have 852 divided by two times.

how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-3
how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-3

152 and divided by 26 point nine eight and we end up with exactly one thats interesting exactly two thousand four hundred kilojoules and that makes a problem a whole lot easier when you have this relationship. So. What you do is you start with the number of joules of the reaction.
Then you want to know how many moles of the reactant that youre interested in you have in the reaction. So you go reaction divided by the number of moles and then you want to convert that to mass and so we have the mass of the sample and divide that by the molar mass. So it gives you the ratio of based upon this many grams of the aluminum and knowing that this is the molar mass.
How many moles of the lumen. Do we have in our sample. And now we proportion that the number of moles in our reaction.
And when all that we get the proper number was also released in the reaction. And thats how you do a problem like that .

how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-4
how much energy is evolved during the formation of 98.7 g of fe, according to the reaction below?-4

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